Archive for UC 101

UC 101: Educating Our New President – Lesson #4

UC 101: Educating Our New President

Lesson #4 – Overgrown Administrative Bureaucracies – August 19, 2013

 by Charles Schwartz, Professor Emeritus, UC Berkeley
Posted at http://UniversityProbe.org
[Introduction, July 22; Lesson #1, July 29;  Lesson #2, August 5;
Lesson #3, August 12 ]

This lesson will, incidentally, showcase two classical Methods of Inquiry that are ingrained in the academic world:  the Scientific Method, involving the collection and analysis of empirical data; the Socratic Method, involving a series of questions put forward to stimulate critical thinking about some puzzle.

The particular objective here is to understand what appears to be long-term cancerous growth of the managerial sector in the University of California. The following graph shows the latest data; and the text after that conveys a sad story of official responses.
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UC 101: Educating Our New President – Lesson #3

UC 101: Educating Our New President

Lesson #3 – Bad Financial Bookkeeping – August 12, 2013
by Charles Schwartz, Professor Emeritus, UC Berkeley
Posted at http://UniversityProbe.org
[Introduction, July 22; Lesson #1, July 29; Lesson #2, August 5]

What could be more boring than bookkeeping? We all have our own checkbooks and credit cards and household accounts to keep track of; and the Internet lets us play with our bank accounts in a familiar way.

Of course, a big university has a lot of money flows and will need a substantial system of budgeting and accounting to keep track of all that. It can get complicated; but it should be understandable and credible. There is already an official commitment to “transparency and accountability.” We should explore that with a critical eye.
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UC 101: Educating Our New President – Lesson #2

UC 101: Educating Our New President

Lesson #2 –  August 5, 2013
Executive Compensation at UC and the Misplaced Corporate Mentality

 by Charles Schwartz, Professor Emeritus, UC Berkeley
Posted at http://UniversityProbe.org  [Introduction, July 22; Lesson #1, July 29 ]

 

Here is a Letter-to-the-Editor published by the San Francisco Chronicle on July 22, just a few days after The Regents appointed Janet Napolitano to be the new President of the University of California.

A big UC payday

Incoming UC President Janet Napolitano’s base salary of $570,000 is outrageous and obscene … and it’s $20,000 a year less than her predecessor Mark Yudof.
And they want to keep raising tuition?
This is a “public” university?

Complaints about excessive compensation for UC executives have been a staple in public discourse for many years. Those criticisms come from newspaper editors and elected officials in Sacramento as well as from many individual citizens, on and off the University’s  campuses.
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UC 101: Educating Our New President – Lesson #1

UC 101: Educating Our New President

Lesson #1 – The Primacy of Public Education –  July 29, 2013

 by Charles Schwartz, Professor Emeritus, UC Berkeley

Posted at http://UniversityProbe.org  [Introduction, July 22]

The President of the University of California should be a leading advocate for all of Public Education throughout the nation. This means working with others to avoid and reverse the disease of privatization that is so severely damaging democracy’s most vital institutions.
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UC 101: Educating Our New President – Intro

UC 101: Educating Our New President

 Introduction, July 22, 2013

 by Charles Schwartz, Professor Emeritus, UC Berkeley

Janet Napolitano has just been appointed by the Regents of the University of California to be the next President of this great university.  It has been noted that she has impressive abilities and experience in several areas of the public sphere, but not in higher education.  One may expect that she will start out on a “listening tour” of the campuses, to better acquaint herself with the existing structure, personnel and culture of this institution.  That is a familiar “top-down” approach to gaining legitimacy upon assuming leadership from outside.

What I propose here is an experiment in “bottom-up” education.
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